10 Common Facebook scams 2013 -Part 2.

Have you kept the first 5 common scams on Facebook that we talked about in our last post? If you need a little recap, check out 10 Common Facebook scams 2013 <Part 1>.

Ready? Now, let’s get into the next 5!

6.         Phony message on Facebook

  • Scammer from Facebook team: A phishing scam spotted by GFI Lab early this year. You will go through 5 pages of question for a security check after clicking on the link. Once the scammer has your information, it will start to spam your friends or use your identity and card information to purchase things you will never receive.
Phony message from Facebook Team spotted by GFI Lab

Phony message from Facebook Team spotted by GFI Lab

  • Check out my new Camera: I’ve seen too many times that my friends try to show me their new shopping trophy through Facebook chat; while we all know the link of the pictures will not take you to their new camera or new clothes,  but some spams or malware.
  • I need your help (and money!): Your friend won’t ask for your help by just leaving a Facebook message, especially when s/he needs your financial support. A tip to keep in mind, they usually ask you to transfer money via Western Union or other uncommon financial institute. Be cautious!

7.        Customize you Facebook:  Apps to find out who unfriend you, to change your Facebook color or getting “Dislike” button are just a few tricks of the scammers. Scammers usually insert adware, malware into the browser extension or plugins.

Red Facebook Hoax

Red Facebook Hoax

One of the most popular scam on Facebook early this year is the make-your-Facebook-red scam. After clicking the link 계속 읽기

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10 Common Facebook scams 2013 -part 1.

By March 2013, Facebook just reached 1.11 billion active users; I believe you or your friends are one of the 1.11 billion users. However the fast growing numbers of Facebook users indeed greatly raise the concerns of spamming on social network.  We list out 10 common Facebook scams for you to prevent from being fooled! We will share the first 5 today and the rest on Friday so stay tuned!

1.       See who’s looking at your Facebook?

You may have seen posts in your timeline like this. Telling you to click on the link and follow the steps to find out who is stalking your Facebook or blocking you. Well, it just won’t work because Facebook didn’t give any apps developer the permission to access such user data they need.

2.       Too good to be true

There’s no such thing as a free lunch! People always fall for the scam of getting free stuff. Here are some common freebie traps for you to keep in mind:

  • Free Facebook credit: gamers on Facebook! It costs real money by using credits to plant corns or raise pets on Facebook. There is no way they will be given out for free!
  • Freebies: such as “2 Free Southwest airline tickets by clicking the button” or “Take the survey to get free subway.”2 free tickets and a free subway sound like a good deal! Unfortunately they are not real deal. This scam can also be seen on Instagram and spam email. In some cases, people took the survey and were expecting a free subway coupon to come to their mail; but instead, they received a charge fee on their phone bill.
2 free SW ticket

2 Free Southwest tickets scam

  • Free iPad & iPod: Don’t be silly. This  is definitely just another marketing trick!
  • Limited time offer of free app goodies: Take LINE as an example, a popular messaging app available on Android and iPhone. Occasionally you will see some promotion like this ”Leave your LINE ID and your phone number in the comment in 24 hours to get this stickers for free.” Follow the instruction then you will never get the free sticker but the complaint from your friends of you spamming their Facebook!

3.       OMG headline 계속 읽기

Tips on Keeping Yourself Protected Online

First and foremost, you should be sure your PC is protected by an up-to-date antivirus. If you don’t have one, or are interested in trying a new software, visit our website and review our products. Roboscan Internet Security updates itself multiple times a day and does so silently – no annoying prompts, no extra work for you! You can even check out this nifty chart and see how Roboscan compares to popular antivirus software.

If you have an antivirus installed, you’ve taken the biggest precaution in keeping your PC protected from malware. Follow the tips below for extra protection.

  • Change your passwords periodically. Try to use letters, numbers and symbols. The more complex your password is, the less likely someone will gain access to your accounts. It’s generally a good idea not to use the same password for some accounts. For example, your online banking password should not be the same as your Facebook password.
  • Update your Wi-Fi password and network name. If your network at home isn’t protected, that’s absolutely essential. Contact your internet provider, or review your router’s manual for instructions on how to secure your network. Your Wi-Fi password should be updated periodically as well. A good general rule of thumb is to change your passwords with each change of season, or four times a year.
  • Lockdown your social media profiles. Consider going private on Twitter, reviewing your privacy settings on Facebook and deleting old social media profiles you no longer use. Awhile ago, I did a Google search on my full name and found a Friendster account from 10 years ago. Horrifying.
  • Don’t reveal too much of your personal information online. Have you ever had to reset a password and answer security questions to do so? Your date of birth, your mother’s maiden name, etc. can easily slip out online, and if your profiles are public, predators can piece together information about you pretty easily.
  • If you’re using shared computers or public networks on your devices, be very careful. Public wi-fi networks are especially dangerous, as we often won’t think twice about checking our account balances online, paying your electricity bill, or writing emails with sensitive content. If you’re shopping online, be sure the site is using a secure channel to process your billing information. Check the address bar. If the URL begins with “https,” you are good to go.

Above all, always be aware that most what you put on the Internet can be accessed by anyone, at any time. Be on defense and stay proactive.

What are your tips for staying safe online?