[Update] Roboscan Update Server Issue Solved

Dear Roboscan users,

Last week our update server experienced some problems that caused the failure of updating; however, the issue is now resolved.

Please try updating Roboscan again for the most protection to your PC. To confirm the update has completed successfully, please click “”View Log” on the lower left of Roboscan interface.

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Update Roboscan for the most protection to your PC

If the problem remains or if you have questions, please email us at support@roboscan.com for further assistance from our tech team!

We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for supporting Roboscan!

Roboscan Team.

Download the latest Roboscan Internet Security for Free here

[News] Google Releases Patch to OEM for Serious Android Security Loophole

Major Android security vulnerability was discovered by Bluebox labs, the research team of Bluebox that a master key hole can turn any application into a Torjan malware and take over 99% of the Android smartphones for the past 4 years. On July 10th, Google had already release the patch to OEM to shop to customer.

It is said that this significant flaw had been around since Android 1.6 (Android 1.6 Donut). It may impact any Android phone for the past four years; in other words, 900 million devices could be affected.

According to Gina Scigliano, Google’s Android communications manager, “A patch has been provided to our partners—some OEMs, like Samsung, are already shipping the fix to the Android devices.” However,  in order to update the security system, current Android users have to turn to their hardware vendors for updates.

In order to assure that the software has not been modified by a third-party, each program contains cryptographic signature of authentic Android application. However, such security loophole allows hackers to enable the malicious code under the condition of not affecting the cryptographic signature. In consequence, any Android developer who takes the advantage of such loophole can access to use’s phone like a legit regular app.

Nevertheless, Android users shouldn’t be worried too much. Scigliano also said that “We have not seen any evidence of exploitation in Google Play or other app stores via our security scanning tools,” “Google Play scans for this issue – and Verify Apps provides protection for Android users who download apps to their devices outside of Play.”

More about Android security: Most Androids Vulnerable Due to Outdated Firmware

Turn on 2-step authentication to enhance your social media security

Do you still remember the article about “2-step authentication” we shared on Facebook? Today, we are going to walk you through the process of setting up 2-step authentication on your social media step-by-step.  2-step authentication is not a cure-it-all for your internet security. However, it certainly makes it more difficult for hackers to break through your security line.

What is 2-step authentication?

2-step authentication (a.k.a. two-factor authentication) is composed of two pieces of authentication factors: the knowledge factor, something you know, and the possession factor, something you have. It’s similar to the idea of requiring 2 keys to open a treasure chest. In addition to the password you originally created for emails, social media or even online banking accounts (knowledge factor), you will need another key (possession factor) to access to your accounts. Your phone is one of the most popular options nowadays. By activating such security feature on your social media, you will receive a set of codes on your phone. Use this code to access your account after typing in the password you normally use.

How to set up?

  1. Click on the setting button on the upper right corner and choose the account setting option.

    Facebook login approval

    Facebook login approval

  2. On the navigation panel on your left, choose “security”; it will take you to the screen below.
  3. Enable the “Login Approval” security feature then Facebook will walk you through
    FB login approval2
  4. Facebook will send you a set of codes via SMS. Type the code in the box, then click next. As you enter the security code, you will have the option to save your device to your account so that you don’t have to generate a code for the device every time you log in
    FB login approval3
  5. If you ever login via a device unrecognized by Facebook, you will need to enter the code again. 계속 읽기

Tips on Keeping Yourself Protected Online

First and foremost, you should be sure your PC is protected by an up-to-date antivirus. If you don’t have one, or are interested in trying a new software, visit our website and review our products. Roboscan Internet Security updates itself multiple times a day and does so silently – no annoying prompts, no extra work for you! You can even check out this nifty chart and see how Roboscan compares to popular antivirus software.

If you have an antivirus installed, you’ve taken the biggest precaution in keeping your PC protected from malware. Follow the tips below for extra protection.

  • Change your passwords periodically. Try to use letters, numbers and symbols. The more complex your password is, the less likely someone will gain access to your accounts. It’s generally a good idea not to use the same password for some accounts. For example, your online banking password should not be the same as your Facebook password.
  • Update your Wi-Fi password and network name. If your network at home isn’t protected, that’s absolutely essential. Contact your internet provider, or review your router’s manual for instructions on how to secure your network. Your Wi-Fi password should be updated periodically as well. A good general rule of thumb is to change your passwords with each change of season, or four times a year.
  • Lockdown your social media profiles. Consider going private on Twitter, reviewing your privacy settings on Facebook and deleting old social media profiles you no longer use. Awhile ago, I did a Google search on my full name and found a Friendster account from 10 years ago. Horrifying.
  • Don’t reveal too much of your personal information online. Have you ever had to reset a password and answer security questions to do so? Your date of birth, your mother’s maiden name, etc. can easily slip out online, and if your profiles are public, predators can piece together information about you pretty easily.
  • If you’re using shared computers or public networks on your devices, be very careful. Public wi-fi networks are especially dangerous, as we often won’t think twice about checking our account balances online, paying your electricity bill, or writing emails with sensitive content. If you’re shopping online, be sure the site is using a secure channel to process your billing information. Check the address bar. If the URL begins with “https,” you are good to go.

Above all, always be aware that most what you put on the Internet can be accessed by anyone, at any time. Be on defense and stay proactive.

What are your tips for staying safe online?