Shadow IT, Good or Bad?

Is Shadow IT Good or Bad?

Is Shadow IT Good or Bad?

Some of you might or might not have heard of the term “Shadow IT.” It means the technology that is not formally supported or built by the company . They are not a part of the core IT solution or mobile devices of the company.

Bring your own device (BYOD) policy becomes more common in the working environment, especially in start-up business.  However, there are pros and cons.

On the bright side…

Shadow IT can be an important source of innovation of an organization. Some technology may then become an official approved solution for the company. Meanwhile, if employees were allowed to bring their personal mobile devices to work, it might actually help the efficiency of internal information and data exchange. Employees can backup files, make a copy in their personal devices or upload to the cloud then access to the documents later, anytime, anywhere, which highly increases the efficiency of the organization function.

On the flip-side…

Risk management becomes more difficult. BYOD indeed increases the convenience for employees and is beneficial to the company in some way; however, the risk of confidential document outflow comes after.

Some applications or devices outside of company approval may not have strong security support. Meanwhile, it gives company a hard time to to keep track of the company data.

Some organizations make their file available in read-only so that employees can only make copies of the document but not make changes to it. However, employees may be frustrated by the restriction on the devices or limited authorization of data; as a result. efficiency of work decreases.

At the end, is Shadow IT or BYOD good or bed? There is no absolute right answer to this question. It is affirmed that BYOD has a positive influence to the growth of a company; nevertheless, a thorough plan for the risk management is a must.

If you own a company or an organization, will you give the green light to BYOD policy?

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[News] DES SIM Card Security Breach Puts 750 Million Mobile Phone Users In Danger

Your SIM card is now hackable!

Your SIM card is now hackable!

Thought your mobile phone SIM card is an un-hackable nutshell? Well, you might have to rethink about it because it is now officially “breakable.”

A German researcher, Karstetn Nohl from Security research Labs revealed the hole of GSM encryption. Hackers can remotely break into some outdated DES (Date Encryption Standard) SIM cards and access your personal data with just a personal computer less than 2 minute.

“Give me any phone number and there is some chance I will, a few minutes later, be able to remotely control this SIM card and even make a copy of it,” Nohl said to Forbes.

With only a couple fake text messages sending to your phone that claims coming from a carrier, there is quarter chance that you will receive an error message back containing a set of 56-bit digital key from DES SIM card. With the code, hackers can send malware to the SIM card via text message. From then on, the hacker can monitor the phone calls, hijacks the data and identity on the phone.

Up to 750 million SIM cards could be hacked. Fortunately, many wireless carriers now adapt the newer and more secure triple DES SIM card. GSMA (Global System for Mobile Association) has already notified the security flaw to the SIM card manufactures and vendors. Experts are now striving to find out the optimal solution for the breach. Nohl will give more detail about the research process in the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas on August 1st.

He suggests the industry to take action on such matter and gradually phase out the SIM cards to eliminate the security vulnerability. Consumers using SIM cards more than 3 years old ideally should request for a new card.

 

Related reading:

Google Releases Patch to OEM for Serious Android Security Loophole

Most Androids Vulnerable Due to Outdated Firmware

[Update] Roboscan Update Server Issue Solved

Dear Roboscan users,

Last week our update server experienced some problems that caused the failure of updating; however, the issue is now resolved.

Please try updating Roboscan again for the most protection to your PC. To confirm the update has completed successfully, please click “”View Log” on the lower left of Roboscan interface.

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If the problem remains or if you have questions, please email us at support@roboscan.com for further assistance from our tech team!

We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for supporting Roboscan!

Roboscan Team.

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Most Androids Vulnerable Due to Outdated Firmware

If Android phones all ran the most recent operating system, most threats would be automatically blocked. According to Juniper Network’s Mobile Threat Center, only 4 percent of devices are running Android 4.2 – which was released six months ago.

In a report released this week by Juniper Networks, the number of malicious mobile threats has grown by 614 percent over the last year, compared to only 155 percent in 2011. Almost all mobile malware targets Androids, primarily because cyber criminals want to maximize their ROI. 67.7 percent of smartphones shipped in 2012 were Androids and 92 percent of malware threats targeted the Android OS.

According to Juniper’s MTC, 73 percent of malware exploits the mobile payment process by sending fraudulent premium SMS messages. If Android phones were updated with the latest operating system, 77 percent of these threats would likely be automatically blocked.

Jelly Bean 4.2 is available for many Android smartphones, but is not compatible with all Android devices. Visit Android’s website for more information on 4.2.

Microsoft Offers Bounty to Hackers

Beginning June 26th, Microsoft will launch two rewards programs, aimed toward increasing PC security in machines running Windows 8. The tech giant is offering rewards as high as $150,000 to hackers who can locate and resolve any vulnerabilities.

Hackers as young as 14 years old are eligible to enter. Windows is the predominant operating system throughout the world, and security measures already in place will prove to be difficult to break through for hackers looking for security vulnerabilities.

A rewards system this substantial is sure to attract the world’s top hacking talent. Microsoft is offering $100,000 to anyone who can identify major flaws, and an addition $50,000 for a working solution. Additionally, they are offering $11,000 rewards to anyone who finds a major vulnerability in the beta version of Internet Explorer 11.